Posts tagged ‘LYOG’

August 10, 2017

Bernstein – “Candide”

Oh, where to begin with the plot of this one…

Based on the Voltaire novella of the same name, which I’ve not yet read. We see death, and recovery from death, a seemingly endless repetition of boy loses girl, boy finds girl again, a lot of travelling, and some very short-lived minor roles.

Standard opera rules apply for playing this – watch, watch, count, watch. Particularly in the colloratura number “Glitter and be Gay”. Some of the time signatures are “non-standard”, and there are some eyewatering key changes as well as some tricky rhythmic bits that seem designed to catch the tired bassist. Fortunately, the notes themselves are generally playable. A five-string bass, or a bass with a C string extension is advisable for maximum effect.

One man, all this kit…

Watch the percussionist – in our production, there was only one, and he had got all this kit to play with, and about a quarter of the pit area, so was dashing around like Billy Whizz.

As we go through this, I keep thinking of other music – various bits of G&S come to my mind (“Warders are Ye”, from Yeomen, “He’s Telling A Terrible Story”, from Pirates), Abba (“Money, Money, Money”), Rogers & Hammerstein (“Bali Hai” from South Pacific), the old work song “I’ve Been Working On The Railroad”, to name but five. Add that to the various Monty Python moments (“Medical Love Song” and the general tone of our “Voltaire” which makes me think of the Decomposing Composers). Actually, Monty Python moments abound – there are also references to the “Spanish Inquisition”, and “Luxury”, “And now for something completely different – a man with three buttocks”… Enough. Irrelevant mental meandering.


Right. Let’s start looking at notes and rhythms.

As stated above, a five string bass (or C string extension) is advisable. As is a willingness to suspend disbelief when it comes to bar numbers – these are not necessarily sequential, thanks to the various versions that the score has gone through since its premiere and the current (4th) version.

Overture

Nothing particularly problematic, apart from an extended passage of playing every third crotchet in a passage of 2/2.

5 – Best of All Possible Worlds

This is marked as having two complete bars rest at the start, but, in reality, it’s five crotchets of brisk 2/2.

12 – Dear Boy

Described as being “the only song in the repertoire about sexually transmitted disease” (which I find hard to believe – what about Tom Lehrer’s “I Got It From Agnes”, or Bon Jovi’s “Social Disease”, or Monty Python’s “Medical Love Song”? OK, I’m not staying within genre…) For all that, though, nothing to worry about.

13 – Paris Waltz

The last two notes are (a) important, (b) exposed, and (c) solo. You have been warned.

14 – Glitter and Be Gay

The big issue here is bars 127-138, where there’s an extended passage of mostly playing every third quaver in a section that’s mostly in 4/4 time with the occasional bar of 5/4. Yeah. Counting this hurts.

It might be easier if it had been printed consistently with quaver rests, but it hasn’t. And it’s a big soprano coloratura benefit, so the beat will be pulled around.

15 – Storm Music

Glissando central, but just sliding up & down the D string.

16 – Earthquake Music

The Lisbon Earthquake – which dates this episode of the story to 1st of November 1755.

17 – Auto da Fe

A high day holiday and hanging day. Niiiice. Let’s hope that Pangloss’s head doesn’t detach from his body again like it did during the dress rehearsal, as that would make his reappearance later on even more improbable than it already is… Awkward rhythm:

And some fun notes:

22 – I am Easily Assimilated

This jazzy rhythm can catch you out if you’re not paying attention.

It reappears at the beginning of the Entr’acte and in the finale/bows music.

25 – We Are Women

Features my favourite set of instructions…

Really? crescendo through a pizzicato / rest?

The rest is either straightforward or something we’ve already seen.

Hmm. This post took rather a long time to write – I started it in about 2013, hence any deviation in tenses…

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April 16, 2012

Opera time again!

Well, to be more accurate, operetta, then musical, then opera.

Operatta – Gilbert & Sullivan – The Mikado

Leeds University Union’s Opera Society is putting on G&S’s Mikado next month.
Performance Dates: 2012-05-02 – 2012-05-05
Location: Riley Smith Hall, Leeds University
More details at OperaSoc’s website

Musical – Victoria Wood – Acorn Antiques, the Musical

I know very little about this, having just been approached to see if it’s a go-er for me. It is. Google tells me that it’s being put on by Cleckheaton and Spenborough’s Amateur Operatic & Dramatic Society.
Performance Dates: 2012-05-16 – 2012-05-19
Location: Cleckheaton Town Hall
More information at CSAODS’s website

Opera – Massenet – Manon

Leeds Youth Opera’s summer production is Massenet’s classic opera, Manon. Not done this before – anyone got any tips?
Performance Dates: 2012-07-04 – 2012-07-07
Location: Carriageworks Theatre, Leeds
More information, as it becomes available, at Leeds Youth Opera Group’s website

February 5, 2012

Vaughan Williams – The Poisoned Kiss

This is an opera that isn’t performed very often – I understand that the number of productions it has had since its composition is still in single figures, and the first non-UK production happened this month in New York. I’m not going to discuss the story here, because it’s utterly ludicrous, involving a girl brought up on poisons, and a boy brought up on antidotes… No, it’s making me cross just thinking about it. If you want to know more, then you could always check this version of the synopsis. As a reviewer of a recent production put it, “You have to wonder what Vaughan Williams was on when he composed [it]”.

Anyway, on to the music – mostly playable, but just a few little “moments”.

Overture

Here’s the first trickier bit, the main nastiness being due to a gratuitous tenor clef. I suspect that it used more ink to go into the tenor clef than it saved…

Me? Grumpy? Surely not!

And so into

Act 1

Number 5 – Ensemble

Moderato alla marcia? Hmm. Seems a bit brisk, but think of the Durham Light Infantry – their normal march step is quicker than most units’ quickstep, sorry, double time. The basic four-in-a-bar pulse stays the same between the 4/4 and 12/8.

Number 6 – Duet

Another brisk number… and, near the end, accidentals everywhere.

Number 8 – Ensemble

Starts out as a nice gentle Andantino, but then kicks into an Allegro, with a lot of semiquavers:

Number 13 – Finale

A couple of more interesting moments here. First off, a 3/4 section from Figure 57:

and the final chunk of the “Dance” starting just after figure 62:

Act 2

I’ve not highlighted anything of note in Act 2.

Act 3

Only one particularly tricky moment here.

Number 27 – Trio

There’s a sort of tango feel to this movement (see the tempo mark – “Tempo di Tango (molto moderato)”). However, just as you settle into it, there’s an unpleasant rhythmic kick in bars 6-8.

January 28, 2012

Two weeks, two operas

This is the busiest I’ve been on the bass for a while. I got asked a week or so ago if I would help out with Leeds University’s Opera Society’s production of Don Giovanni that runs next week, which is the week before I’m on a run of Leeds Youth Opera Group’s production of RVW’s Poisoned Kiss. Not much to say here – I’m not sure that I’ve yet played every note of Don G, and those that I have played have mostly been either under the fingers, or not too quick, but I do have a few things to say about Poison, which will get a separate post shortly.

LUU Opera Soc – Mozart – Don Giovanni – 1st-4th February 2012, 7:30pm, Riley Smith Hall, Leeds University. More details on their website.

LYOG – Vaughan Williams – Poisoned Kiss – 8th-11th February 2012, 7:30pm, Carriageworks Theatre, Leeds. More details on their website.