June 18, 2018

Glittering and Being Gay

Following on from my recent “Candide” practice notes post, I forgot to mention this…

You know the Glitter and Be Gay number? Here’s an example featuring, very briefly, Patti Lupone.

“Fraaaance”…

And another version, this one from The Proms 2015 season. Much less American than the previous link.

Aaaanyway, there’s also this very different recording.

This one’s by Madeline Kahn. Who? Well, you might know her better from a saloon in a small town called Rockridge:

Yup. Lili von Shtupp also recorded Glitter & Be Gay…

Advertisements
May 22, 2018

Mozart – Cosi Fan Tutte – Excerpt

Quickie from tonight’s rehearsal for tomorrow night’s performance…

Act 1, Terzetto (#3) – from page 8 of the double bass part at IMSLP

This bit is a bit…awkward. Allegro. A bit too allegro, maybe. Just doesn’t quite fit under my fingers. I would actually look at this if the gig wasn’t tomorrow! Oh well.

May 20, 2018

Rachmaninov – Second Symphony

Just done this on very little rehearsal. A few nasty moments, by far the worst of which is this from the first movement:

From figure 6. It’s fast. The worse news is that I’ve spread this out over three lines so it’s readable – the part I was playing off had all but the first & last bars on just two lines… Ugh.

There’s a shorter passage of similar rhythm at fig.18 in the part I was using, but the notes here lie more easily under the fingers, so I’ve not reproduced it here. There’s also a triplet crotchet/quaver passage near the very end, but, again, that’s less chaotic than this one.

(The rest of the gig was relatively straightforward – Wagner Tannhauser overture & Tchaikovsky Rococo variations…)

May 4, 2018

LUU Opera Society & Me – 6 years, 13 productions, 50 performances

Slightly drifting away from what passes for normality round here, but I thought I would jot down a few random recollections about my time helping out Leeds University Union’s Opera Society.

I have no idea how long it’s been going, but I do remember my introduction to it. I was in rehearsal for something else (playing for Leeds Youth Opera (LYO)), minding my own business (the double bass part). At half time, I was approached by a trumpeter, asking if I could do him a favour. “I’m MD for LUU Opera Soc, we’re doing Don Giovanni in a couple of weeks, and the double bassist I’ve booked has dropped out – would you be able to play for us?”. A week or so later, and not knowing quite what to expect, I arrive at the Sitzprobe (a bit late – I had another appointment earlier that day), and was greeted by an appreciative cheer from one of the singers, who recognised me from an LYO show. That was February 2012. I must have done an OK job, because I’ve been passed on from one MD to the next as someone who might know what he’s doing…

The shows I’ve done, in order, so far…

  • 2012-02 – Mozart – Don Giovanni – set in the 1980s, with some disco thrown in… The star of that one has gone on to study at RNCM and is now studying at the Royal Scottish
  • 2012-05 – G&S – The Mikado (with the previous MD taking the role of Koko). Yum-Yum was last heard of cruising the Pacific as an international opera singer
  • 2013-02 – Massenet – Cendrillion / Cinderalla

I missed the next show (“The Dragon of Wantley”) – I was asked, but the invitation ended up in a spam bin (thanks, Facebook!), and I didn’t see it until after the event. Fortunately (for me) they still invited me back…

  • 2014-02 – Donizetti – L’Elisir D’Amore – with that epic bassoon solo played by, if my memory serves, someone who is now at the Royal Welsh
  • 2014-05 – G&S – Ruddigore. Great fun. But possibly not for the chorus coach, who had to step in as the late Sir Roderic (again, memory may be at fault…) – she’s now studying at RNCM. Other memories include being surprised every night by the stealthy entrance of Rose Maybud, directly behind me, making me jump when her aria started; and my bass being dusted by Old Adam as part of his duties. Oh, and Mad Margaret and her epic prat-falls. “Basingstoke!”
  • 2015-02 – Bizet – Carmen. Which I had previously played with LYO, back when I actually qualified as Youth, rather than as a ringer…
  • 2015-05 – G&S – H.M.S. Pinafore. A very undignified pit here, as the stage had been extended out and round, and we had to clamber over staging to get into place.
  • 2016-02 – Mozart – Magic Flute. Post-apocalyptic wasteland (the set budget was veeery low). There’s a full video of this performance on the youtubes somewhere, if you search carefully. The Queen of The Night is now studying at the Royal Scottish. (Incidentally, both she and Donna Anna from 2012-02’s Don G stood against each other for the presidency of the Royal Scottish’s student union – OperaSoc stand-off!). Other memories – Papagena’s mahoosive hair, and a friendly chorus member starting her long-running habit of pointing guns at me during performances…
  • 2016-05 – G&S – Pirates of Penzance. Major flashbacks here to the last time I was on-stage, rather than in-pit – once upon a time, I sang the part of Frederic, so it was nice to do something different. I couldn’t make one of the performances, but I managed to persuade a friendly bassoonist to give the double bass part a go on the steam-bass (contrabassoon). Always organise a dep if you can’t make a performance! And, on the final night, a takeover – the leader of the orchestra shoved the MD aside, and led us in a rousing arrangement of the Pirates of the Caribbean music instead of the expected Bows music.
  • 2017-02 – Mozart – Don Giovanni. What, again? Have we run out of shows to do? This one, though, was rather different. Directed by the previous year’s Pamina, set as a 1920s-ish house party.
  • 2017-05 – Purcell – Dido & Aeneas. Chamber-style – just a string quintet + harpsichord (played by, erm, the guy who MD’d the Don Giovanni from 2012). This led to a very tight ensemble. Short show, so an early night.
  • 2018-02 – Mozart – Marriage of Figaro, set in the backstage of a theatre. The previous production’s Dido took the role of Cherubino; a previous piratical MD was well-cast as the Count; the director was previously Don Giovanni. And the MD was previously the leader of the orchestra for Dido and Pirates, and should go far given half a chance.

And that brings us to this week…

  • 2018-05 – Offenbach – Orpheus in the Underworld. An ambitious choice for the second semester show. And, in a deviation from the norm, I’m on the cello which is a bit of a shock, and not just for me – even some of the audience are noticing! And Dido-then-Cherubino has crossed the divide and joined the first violins. Very different to the previous Orpheus I did (with Leeds Gilbert & Sullivan Society)

So, an ever-changing group of singers and players – not all are music students – some just do one show, some do many – some of whom ought to go far in the business, others (like me) are just hobbyists, and many are first-timers, just trying something new. This makes for an interesting time, particularly for the casting team, as they never know how many are going to be auditioning. There’s always a shortage of men, though – indeed, this week’s cast of Orpheus is almost entirely female – just three guys taking the roles of Orpheus, Styx, and Pluto.

Assuming I get this delayed publishing thing right, this post should go live just before the interval of my 50th performance with them.

As for the future? For me – I hope I get invited back (preferably on bass!). I enjoy these production weeks enormously, I’ve made some great friends, and look forward to seeing what the next generation gets up to. For them? The show must go on! It’s a lot of hard work, but worth it.

August 26, 2017

What I did on my holidays – 2017 edition

Following on from 2016’s report, and ignoring anything that doesn’t involve the bass or the cello – yes, I had a few sessions on that thing too…

Saturday

On Saturday evening, I made my debut as a percussionist (snare drum) for Rossini’s overture to Thievish Magpie. Fun. And many thanks to Tenley Martin for giving me a couple of lessons in the run-up to this week! There’s no way I would have had the nerve to do this without her help.

Fortunately, that was over quickly enough, and I was able to return to my normal home in the bass section, and we did Schubert’s 3rd symphony (not one of his best), and Arriaga’s symphony. Both new to me.

Sunday

Started the day with the Dvorak Serenade. Flashbacks to when I was declared an honorary wind player in one orchestra because I was their cellist for this…

Orchestral session next, with a New Bug waving his stick around. Schubert 5, Mozart flute concerto, Haydn 78. A couple of tricky moments in the Haydn, which surprised me, as Haydn isn’t normally problematic. New Bug seemed to rather enjoy the experience, which is good, and the orchestra behaved / cooperated, which was also good.

Over to the cello for some flute quartets – Mozart K285 (the third one in the book, after K285a & K285b, go figure), and Ries – a new one on me, but good fun and recommended as a companion piece to the Mozart.

I was scheduled for a four cello group. One of the others brought a pile of stuff that had been arranged for the group (Beatles tunes, Mozart’s Ave Verum, Gounod’s Funeral March of a Marionette (aka Alfred Hitchcock’s theme), that sort of thing), and the parts were all mixed up so nobody got lumbered with just doing the growly stuff.

Impromptu/unscheduled Bruch octet. Yikes. World’s worst key change (or a strong competitor, anyway – 6 flats into five sharps; and then back again a few lines later). Must start a new category or a picture gallery or something for these.

Monday

Wind + string bass group, doing various of Geoffrey Emerson’s “The Red Hedgehog” arrangements – Elgar, sonata in G (op.28). Glazunov, Concert Waltz op.47. Richard Strauss Serenade (pretending to be either a kontrabassoon or a bass tuba) – some moments here. And finally, Durand de Grau’s “Les Clochettes” – a proper contrabassoon part, so needs a five string with a dropped bottom string to get those Bflats going…

Piano + strings – Mendelssohn sextet – rather good. And then we added in a trumpet for the Saint-Saens trumpet septet, which has some unpleasant corners, and lots of unison. And then he gives a nice tune to all the string players (unison) and leaves the bass out of it. For shame.

A mixed nonet session – Rheinberger & Martinu. Got the New Bug to lead the Rheinberger; got a rather more experienced player to do the Martinu, which is, after all, a bit harder…

Rounded off the day with a quintet session – Dvorak op.77 followed by Onslow (one of many) Op.35. Onslow easily playable, but one part does identify this as being a cello part – octave Gs? Not really possible on the bass unless you turn your bow upsidedown and play the strings from underneath. And there wasn’t enough time to do this.

Tuesday

The traditional day of rest – and a trip to Powis Castle.

Back to the music in the evening, with an orchestral session – Hugo Cole’s “Black Lion Dances” – fun – and Tchaikovsky Suite #1 Op.43. There’s even what passes for a double bass tune – at least, we have something vaguely melodic, and everyone else is silent for a couple of beats… At least, in theory they are, not looking at a certain hornplayer who came in in the wrong place!

Wednesday

Piano Quintets – Trout, and Percy Godfrey op.16. Some moments in the Godfrey, if only I can remember what they were. And I really need to remind The Management that I thought we had a “no Trout before coffee” rule.

Septets – Beethoven, Lichtenthal – a new one on me. This Lichtenthal chappie, 1780-1858, surgeon, apparently, which is possibly apparent from his way of composing by slicing up a bit of Mozart… To paraphrase Tom Lehrer, though, “It’s not plagiarism, it’s research” – “Lobachevsky

Mendelssohn Octet (2nd cello) – fun. It’s been a long time since I played this, and rather enjoyed myself. And got to do the beginning of the final movement a few times.

And in the evening, I was back on the bass – Schubert & Rheinberger octets were scheduled, so we played the Schubert, and then noticed that the Rheinberger isn’t for the same combination of players (requiring an oboe), and so we called it a night. The Schubert is a monster, though, so we didn’t feel short-changed.

Thursday

String orchestra to start the day. Mozart, Div.K136 – playing a cello part on the bass. Nothing to worry about here. Pachelbel – ugh. Warlock – Capriol Suite – some good brisk speeds, which was fun. Vaughan Williams – Charterhouse Suite. Not particularly inspiring

This was followed by a full orchestra session – Mendelssohn – Duo – Two Clarinets (well, one clarinet, one basset horn); Mozart Overture “La Clemenza di Tito”; Mozart – Symphony 35 “Haffner”; Hugo Cole – “Black Lion Dances” again.

An off-piste run through the Dvorak quintet op.77, with a couple of different players and a couple the same as earlier in the week.

And in the evening – Dvorak Bagatelles, Debussy Children’s Corner (a couple of numbers) and various other bits, Finzi (Severn Rhapsody) in a mixed wind/strings group.

Finally, a late-night sneaky rehearsal run of Brandenburg 5, for the benefit of a young violinist that was convinced that she was playing it the following day…

Friday

The bass was feeling a bit tired, so the final day was a bit of a heavy one.

Friday started off badly, with a session of baroquery – half of which was missing parts. I ended up reading the Brandenburg 3 bass part from my phone… Still, some good solos from the younger contingent with the Vivaldi concerto for 2 cellos in D Minor and the JSBach violin Concerto in A minor both being very well done. Pity that the orchestral numbers were so overpowering.

And then there was a change of personnel for a really large string piece – Tchaikovsky’s “Souvenir de Florence”, in the string orchestra version. Huge, unrelenting stuff.

And then a couple of heavy symphonies – Mendelssohn’s first (“written before he’d learnt the art of brevity”), and Beethoven 7. That would have been the end of the week, but for one last surprise…

…which was back to the cello for the final official send-off session – Mozart K515 (quintet in C), and Brahms Sextet op.36.

Saturday

Back home. Laundry. Sleep.

Tags:
August 10, 2017

Bernstein – “Candide”

Oh, where to begin with the plot of this one…

Based on the Voltaire novella of the same name, which I’ve not yet read. We see death, and recovery from death, a seemingly endless repetition of boy loses girl, boy finds girl again, a lot of travelling, and some very short-lived minor roles.

Standard opera rules apply for playing this – watch, watch, count, watch. Particularly in the colloratura number “Glitter and be Gay”. Some of the time signatures are “non-standard”, and there are some eyewatering key changes as well as some tricky rhythmic bits that seem designed to catch the tired bassist. Fortunately, the notes themselves are generally playable. A five-string bass, or a bass with a C string extension is advisable for maximum effect.

One man, all this kit…

Watch the percussionist – in our production, there was only one, and he had got all this kit to play with, and about a quarter of the pit area, so was dashing around like Billy Whizz.

As we go through this, I keep thinking of other music – various bits of G&S come to my mind (“Warders are Ye”, from Yeomen, “He’s Telling A Terrible Story”, from Pirates), Abba (“Money, Money, Money”), Rogers & Hammerstein (“Bali Hai” from South Pacific), the old work song “I’ve Been Working On The Railroad”, to name but five. Add that to the various Monty Python moments (“Medical Love Song” and the general tone of our “Voltaire” which makes me think of the Decomposing Composers). Actually, Monty Python moments abound – there are also references to the “Spanish Inquisition”, and “Luxury”, “And now for something completely different – a man with three buttocks”… Enough. Irrelevant mental meandering.


Right. Let’s start looking at notes and rhythms.

As stated above, a five string bass (or C string extension) is advisable. As is a willingness to suspend disbelief when it comes to bar numbers – these are not necessarily sequential, thanks to the various versions that the score has gone through since its premiere and the current (4th) version.

Overture

Nothing particularly problematic, apart from an extended passage of playing every third crotchet in a passage of 2/2.

5 – Best of All Possible Worlds

This is marked as having two complete bars rest at the start, but, in reality, it’s five crotchets of brisk 2/2.

12 – Dear Boy

Described as being “the only song in the repertoire about sexually transmitted disease” (which I find hard to believe – what about Tom Lehrer’s “I Got It From Agnes”, or Bon Jovi’s “Social Disease”, or Monty Python’s “Medical Love Song”? OK, I’m not staying within genre…) For all that, though, nothing to worry about.

13 – Paris Waltz

The last two notes are (a) important, (b) exposed, and (c) solo. You have been warned.

14 – Glitter and Be Gay

The big issue here is bars 127-138, where there’s an extended passage of mostly playing every third quaver in a section that’s mostly in 4/4 time with the occasional bar of 5/4. Yeah. Counting this hurts.

It might be easier if it had been printed consistently with quaver rests, but it hasn’t. And it’s a big soprano coloratura benefit, so the beat will be pulled around.

15 – Storm Music

Glissando central, but just sliding up & down the D string.

16 – Earthquake Music

The Lisbon Earthquake – which dates this episode of the story to 1st of November 1755.

17 – Auto da Fe

A high day holiday and hanging day. Niiiice. Let’s hope that Pangloss’s head doesn’t detach from his body again like it did during the dress rehearsal, as that would make his reappearance later on even more improbable than it already is… Awkward rhythm:

And some fun notes:

22 – I am Easily Assimilated

This jazzy rhythm can catch you out if you’re not paying attention.

It reappears at the beginning of the Entr’acte and in the finale/bows music.

25 – We Are Women

Features my favourite set of instructions…

Really? crescendo through a pizzicato / rest?

The rest is either straightforward or something we’ve already seen.

Hmm. This post took rather a long time to write – I started it in about 2013, hence any deviation in tenses…

June 29, 2017

“Expect The Unexpected” – aka “Pick A Clef, Any Clef” – aka “Who Was This Zelenka Person Anyway?”

I was sent advanced notice of a piece I’ve not played before – Zelenka’s Simphonie a 8 Concertanti (link goes to IMSLP).

Was somewhat perturbed to see this in the first movement:

Alto clef? on a bass? The problem is the same in the bassoon & cello parts. We think the top note is meant to be a B, so Alto clef is right, but it’s still wrong. If you see what I mean. I guess we’ll find out when we actually rehearse this thing in September.

Tags: ,
June 4, 2017

Grat[ear]Plug: ISOLATE earplugs

Yeah, it’s been a bit quiet here of late, and that’s not because of the earplugs…

I’ve been in some rather loud concerts lately – the joys of playing with upcoming professionals, I guess. I also work in a rather noisy office environment. These two things (and some discussion with friends) led me to decide I needed some earplugs. But what to get?

I googled, and found these ISOLATE Earplugs. Not the cheapest things in the world, but seemed to be well thought-of, so I ordered a pair and gave them a bit of a going over.

Some highly unscientific and objective observations.

Positives

  • Effective, oh yes, so effective.
  • I tried them in the office. Couldn’t hear people who were talking to me. Bliss.
  • I tried them on the bus. Couldn’t hear people’s noisy headphones, phone conversations, the engine of the bus… I was sitting right at the back, on top of the engine, and I could hear very little of it. Quietest ride home ever.
  • I’ve even tried them in rehearsal. They’re a bit too effective when used as a pair! For me, anyway – as a bassist, I’m usually right out on the edge of things, rather than in the middle… But when I use a plug in the right ear, and leave the left one open, suddenly I can survive even the loudest rehearsal (or concert). I’ve used them in a Firebird gig like this, and could hear the music and had no idea that Sam (the bass drum) had opened a can of whup-ass and scared the audience out of its collective skin. I’ll be using the same technique in tonight’s performance of Shostakovic 10.
  • three different sizes supplied; refills available once you work out which size is best for you.

Negatives

  • Small, and easy to lose. The pouch that they come in takes up less space than my bass rosin pot.
  • A bit fiddly – if you don’t get them inserted just so, then obviously they are less effective. Tricky to do one-handed.
  • Price. £25, give or take. And they do a more expensive one too…

Overall Verdict

Worth it.

September 4, 2016

What I Did On My Holidays – 2016

Band Camp Report – 2016

Following on from the 2015 Band Camp Report

This year… Unfortunately, one of our oboists fell ill a few days before the start of the week; fortunately, we mostly had it covered. However, and even less fortunately, “mostly” doesn’t mean “entirely”…

As usual, this list only contains stuff I’ve played – the barbershop singing doesn’t count, and neither does helping out the children / junior / beginner orchestra. And you can’t hold that against me. And let’s not talk about the late-nights, the conversations or the cards against humanity games.

Saturday Evening

The usual inaugural orchestral system. This time:

  • Beethoven – Coriolan overture – I have this vague feeling we’ve done this before.
  • Haydn Symphony 99
  • Hamish MacCunn – “Land of the Mountain And Flood” – there’s a rather unpleasant semiquaver passage on the penultimate page, but the rest is playable. This year was the centenary of the MacCunn’s death – which is as good as an excuse as any for this. Unfortunately for us, we don’t have a full brass section, so the fanfare was a bit sparse – the immortal Colin R playing one part, and my father attempting to sing a trumpet part from his position on the podium. Didn’t quite work…

Sunday

Quintet session to start:

  • Dvorak op 77
  • Dvorak Two waltzes, Op.52 – I don’t think I’ve played these before.
  • Onslow Op.25

The parts for this last contain the story about why Onslow’s quintets are so often alternately scored – it seems as though, at the premiere of one of them, the second cellist didn’t turn up. However, Onslow’s friend Dragonetti was in the audience, and (of course) stepped up… So, as this was a cello part, I switched to cello to play it. And Onslow started writing double bass parts

After coffee, another orchestral session, this time with the extra horror of me playing second oboe. First time I’ve done that with this group (or, indeed, any orchestral group) for, oh, 15-20 years? The programme:

  • Haydn symphonies 88 & 89
  • Karl Stamitz double concerto for violin & viola (Rosanna & Julia)

The evening was full of the Schubert Octet. What more could you want?

Monday

Started the day with a Trout quintet; we had a quick go at the first movement of the RVW concerto for the same combination, but this wasn’t particularly successful – maybe we were all a bit … tired … This was early RVW, and had been suppressed by the composer, but his widow was persuaded to release them after his death. Was this disrespectful of RVW’s wishes? Did she need the money? I guess we’ll never know…

Next session – yet another orchestral session:

  • Dittersdorf – Sinfonia Concertante for viola & double bass, although not necessarily in that order 😉 And I was the bassist, with my wife taking the viola solo. Was well received, if not an entirely accurate rendition – the conductor was giggling well into the afternoon
  • Stimitz – the other one – Viola Concertante in Bb (Ellen)
  • JSB – Brandenburg 6 (Sarah and Jessica, who had had approximately no notice…) Fun times.

Not quite sure how, but I had the evening off.

Tuesday

After the usual day of rest (involving a castle, coffee, cake, and an osteopath…), the evening was taken up with a big Mozart orchestral session:

  • Sinfonia Concertante K297 – for Oboe, Clarinet, Bassoon, Horn (Mike, Julian, Vince, Kevin).
  • Sinfonia Concertante K364 – for Violin & Viola (Ian & Andrew)
  • Symphony 40 – K550

Wednesday

The day started with the usual Wednesday Workshop. This time, we did a couple of pieces by our very own David Marsh (his Highland March and his Waltz in G), and then finished up with the Serenade by Joseph Suk.

Next session was an old familiar favourite – the Beethoven Septet. This is a regular gig with five members of my family playing with the leader of the week and a guest cellist. It’s been like that for a very long time; however, Our Glorious Leader felt he had to stand down. He did arrange a deputy – one of his sons, Ian – who seemed to know his way around the violin… Fortunately, he had been properly briefed and the diplomatic relations between violin / horn were unharmed.

We also had a quick go at the last movement of the septet by Peter Lichtenthal (1780-1858), which was new to us all. As time was short, we did just the last movement, which was good pleasant stuff. Must try it properly some time.

In the afternoon, an impromptu piano quartet session (me on cello), doing Turina’s piano quartet – seemed to be a very relaxed piece of music – and a spot of Mozart.

The second half of the afternoon was a session of music brought back by one of our colleagues who has been working in Qatar – lots of quartertones! So difficult to persuade the brain / fingers to play out of (normal) tune. Very thin harmonically, but that’s the way they do it… What was really confusing was when one of the pieces had a key signature of one semi-flat… “Not quite F major?” Something like that.

The evening kicked off with the Balakirev Octet – I have no memories of what this thing was like. Which isn’t necessarily a bad sign… After this, the group fractured, and three of us were banished to a smaller room with a trio by Leopold Hoffman (Op 1/3, for viola, cello and double bass) which worked rather well.

Thursday

This was the longest day. It started with another session of Quintets:

  • Dvorak – op.77 again – “does this get done often?” asked one of the violinists. Erm… yes. “I don’t remember playing it” Well, you wouldn’t. There are umpteen violinists / violaists / cellists here, but only a couple of us bassists…
  • Onslow – op.38. “The Bullet”. The autobiographical string quintet. Again, it’s a double cello job, so I switched.

Next session was, oh look, another orchestral session:

  • Cimarosa – Concerto for Winds – seven soloists? two flutes, two oboes, two horns and a bassoon.
  • Haydn – Sinfonie Concertante (for violin, cello, oboe, bassoon) – this was fun, except for the poor viola players who found themselves sitting in front of my oboe
  • Mozart – back to the bass for the Piano concerto 25 / K503. Nice end to the morning.

We managed to sneak in a crafty Martinu nonet – my only nonet session of the week, which was surprising. I normally get a few of these, and I rather missed them. I think that the violinist was new to the piece, which makes for a trickier run-through. (This was an ad-hoc session, and the violinist we thought we had had it in mind that we were booking for 4pm rather than 3pm, so we had to go on the scrounge for a spare violinist…)

The choral society number – for a change, I was in the band. We did Handel’s Coronation Anthems, but in an unusual order, ending with the big “Zadok” number. This was a surprisingly tough session, and I was beginning to feel rather tired by the end of it. Not a good sign, considering the rest of the day’s line-up.

The final official session of the day was a wind group, doing a couple of the big classics:

  • Mozart – “Gran Partita”, K361. Great fun, but I was joined by a contrabassoonist for double the bassitude… *cough*pizzicato?*cough*
  • Dvorak Serenade (one of the hornists from earlier switched to cello)

The day ended with a run of all six Brandenburgs, done by a chosen few, and without a conductor – proper chamber-style, rather than the more orchestral-based renditions elsewhen in the week. The running order was non-numeric, with us aiming to get the wind-based ones out of the way first, and then gradually reduced the forces ending with #5. The session started at about 10pm, and was over by 12:30am, which is pretty good going, considering… But, ye gods, there were some interesting notation issues, including the bass part going down to a bottom Bb (off the range even of a normally-tuned five-string…)

And a *very* late night of drinking, followed by nowhere near enough sleep…

Friday

Once again, the day started with an orchestral session, heavy on the Bach

  • Corelli – Concerto Grosso Op 6/12
  • JSB – Concert for Violin & Oboe
  • JSB – Brandenburgs! 5 & 3. This was a big contrast of style with the late night run – this time, we had 3 desks of each of violin 1, 2, viola, cello…

Next session was a workshop (again), looking at the Elgar Introduction & Allegro – and a really great session it was. Fabulous music, really well led & controlled session, led by the MD of the Apollo Chamber Orchestra. Lovely chap, and Really Rather Good cellist.

The final orchestral session was big. Really big. “Beethoven’s Big Ones”:

  • Egmont
  • Triple Concerto
  • Symphony 8

A huge session. And the day / week wasn’t over, as a few of us had the last “hurrah” with a Brahms sextet (we were supposed to do #2, but we did #1 instead – pure accident, nothing to do with big tunes…), followed up by Mozart Quintet K515 (Gwen & I did two movements each).

Aftermath

And so, home, laundry, bed…

…and a hope that Helen returns fighting fit next year, so I don’t have to play oboe at short notice!

Tags:
November 26, 2015

Amahl and the Night Visitors by Menotti

No? Me neither.

Apparently, this short opera was written for a TV company, and is appropriate for the season of, erm, next month. So we (Northern Opera Group) are rehearsing it now for production in Leeds Corn Exchange next Friday / Saturday (4th / 5th December). Something like that. There’s a Facebook page and everything.

I’m told that this is supposed to be a chamber work, and that the orchestration was for a few string players – including just one contrabass. Which leads me to wonder why there are a few bits marked “divisi” (playable by one person easily enough), and, indeed, “2 soli” (not so easy to do on your own!).

From a double bass player’s perspective, it’s not that difficult, as long as you remember rule 1 of playing opera (“Watch”), and don’t have problems with counting alternate bars of 5 and 6 quavers (don’t panic – that passage is quite short).

There is just one bit that’s worth of some attention. Figure 65, bars 368 & following – a relatively rapid pizzicato passage that’s got just enough accents and accidentals and irregularities of rhythm to be not quite readable. This picture shows the bulk of the passage – there are a couple more lines, but they’re significantly easier.

Amahl - excerpt

That’s the extent of the musical problems. There are other issues with this work, though. I would like to point out a vocal cue at figure 128 (mercifully near the end of the opera), where the young boy Amahl says in a recit passage:

Well, I don’t know if I’m going to let you touch me… Oh… all right… but just once

And once you’ve seen that, it’s difficult to read some of the other cues without sniggering…